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Monthly Archives: October 2018

Anti-Wrinkle Lifestyle

1. Protect your skin from the sun – Without a doubt, the sun is your skin’s worst enemy. The ultraviolet radiation in sunlight causes the collagen and elastin in your skin to break down, which leads to premature wrinkles. One of the best lifestyle changes you can make is to wear a good sunscreen, everyday.

2. Don’t smoke – The harmful toxins in cigarette smoke do all kinds of bad things to your skin, especially your facial skin. Not only does it break down collagen and elastin, just like sunlight does, but it also destroys your skin from the inside. You can’t inhale toxins all day and expect your skin to be healthy. If you smoke, do whatever you have to do to quit. If you don’t smoke, don’t even think about starting!

3. Don’t drink – Alcohol is not good for your skin. One or two drinks occasionally probably won’t hurt. But if you’re drinking every day, your skin definitely isn’t going to be as healthy as it could be. Besides containing toxins, alcohol also dehydrates your body, which is never good for the skin. Old drinkers almost always have more wrinkles and “uglier” skin with more blotches than non-drinkers.

Effects of Tanning Beds

Tanning is a body reaction to ultraviolet radiation, typically of two types UVA and UVB. Both these types of radiation have been associated with side effects of tanning beds where the incidence of over exposure has occurred. The effect of tanning beds that worked on UVB radiation have been well documented, with skin burning being observed frequently. This phenomenon caused manufacturers to shift to UVA-type operation where the effect of tanning beds based on this technology was perceived to be low. However, over-exposure to UVA radiation has been suspected to initiate immune system destabilization. Popular knowledge tells us that over-exposure to the sun’s radiation leads to skin cancer. So sun screens are a must for protection, even in artificial tanning to negate any adverse effect of the tanning bed.

In a way, answering the question “Are tanning beds good for us” is analogous to answering the question “Are French fries good for us”. Puzzled? When you have French fries in the right amount, it’s a great in-between mealtime snack, but when you get consistent overdoses of it, you can be assured of the road to obesity. And so is the effect of tanning beds too! Take all steps to ensure that you are safe on the tanning bed. Do your research, ferret the internet and speak to your doctor if it means so much to reassure yourself.

Treat the tanning bed with respect and you will be rewarded with what can only be called ethereal beauty. Have a safe and enjoyable tanning time!!

Treat Stretch Marks

Stretch marks develop during pregnancy because of rapid and excessive weight gain in areas such as the lower abdomen or thighs. As weight increases, the collagen and elastin in the dermal layer of the skin, responsible for retaining shape and firmness, is stretched to the point of breaking. The dermis is the layer beneath the epidermis, or visible layer of the skin. The elastic fibres in the dermis weaken with stretching and increased cortisone levels normally produced in the last trimester. As these fibres separate and the skin stretches, collagen is overproduced to form scar tissue which result in striations.

There is no cure for stretch marks. The scarring process that has occurred in the dermis cannot be reversed, but stretch marks will flatten, fade and lighten over time. Creams which contain steroids such as hydrocortisone, or active agents like tretinoin (retin-A) should not be used during pregnancy, and especially not during the first trimester when the fetus is highly vulnerable. Plastic surgery methods are available to reduce the appearance of stretch marks, such as dermabrasion or laser, but treatments are expensive and results vary.

Genetics play a role in whether a pregnant woman will develop stretch marks, but equally influential factors are the condition of the skin and nutrition in determining the onset and severity of stretch mark development. Well-hydrated and healthy skin stretches more easily, so drinking plenty of fluids and eating foods rich in vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc and silica, a component in collagen formation, are beneficial.

Lotions, creams and other topical treatments will not reach the dermis, but they can help relieve the itchiness or dryness associated with stretch marks. Keeping the skin moisturized decreases any discomfort that may be felt and if stretch marks are treated when they first appear, their appearance may be reduced significantly. Massaging nutrient-rich natural oils such as wheatgerm, jojoba or vitamin E can help heal the epidermis and also increase blood circulation to the affected area, assisting the healing process. Pregnant women should avoid products containing clary sage, basil, cinnamon or thyme, as these might adversely affect the fetus.

Soft Hair

Hold on, stop the boat, get the nose clip out, ‘you use urine therapy’ they say, ‘yes, it’s amazing’ with that you gently glide into the sunset with your hair bouncing for joy.

Ok, it seems a little like a hair spray commercial, that is all except the urine therapy part, but its true, your OWN urine is one of natures gifts.

First of all lets dispense with a few myths about natures finest.

Urine smells!

Well actually urine does smell, about 20 minutes after leaving the body a certain amount of oxidation takes place and a ammonia like smell occurs, but its harmless and good ventilation or aroma oil keeps the smell down.

Urine is poisonous!

Well actually its not, 95% of urine is water, 2.5% consists of urea and the remaining 2.5% is a mixture of minerals, salt, hormones and enzymes. Toxic substances are being removed from the body through the liver, intestines, skin and through the out-breath.

Medical researchers have discovered that many of the elements of the blood that are found in urine have enormous medicinal value, and when reintroduced to the body, they boost the body’s immune defenses and stimulate healing in a way that nothing else does.

I’m not going to try and convince you about the purity of urine, if you do a search on the net with ‘urine therapy’ there are many pages describing to process through the body that creates good wholesome urine. In fact its only in the last 50 years that urine has gone out of fashion, it has been highly praised through out history as a natural substance that has many healing properties. One of the biggest users of urine has been the cosmetic industry, traditionally produced by horses, it is used as a skin moisturizer. It is only since the rise of the pharmaceutical industry that the use of urine as a general medicine has ceased, well in the West, it is still highly prized in the Far East. Nothing to do with the fact that pharmaceutical companies can’t make a profit from it no doubt.

I’ve had personal experience with its amazing properties. As a child I had eczema, my skin was always cracked and dry, as I grow older and changed my diet I grow out of it, except for a bad patch on my right elbow. No cream or ointment could cure this patch, it would often bleed, especially when I was asleep. The I saw a children’s TV series, on a particular episode was a Dutchman called Coen Van Der Kroon who had wrote a book called ‘Golden Fountain : The Complete Guide to Urine Therapy’, I was so intrigued I tried the treatment. I put urine on my elbow 3/4 times a day, always washing my hands afterwards of course. After about two weeks, the eczema had disappeared and my skin completely re-generated and I’ve not had any problems since. Every so often I also use it on my skin, although 49 years old, I’ve skin like a young child.